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Top Berlin Attractions Families, Couples - What to do in Berlin Attractions Map

Popular Berlin Attractions Map - What to Do in Berlin

OVERVIEW OF TOP BERLIN ATTRACTIONS MAP FOR FAMILIES, COUPLES

Berlin has a fascinating history and much to offer for any family holiday. It’s certainly a city with its history prominently displayed, such as the East Side Gallery, a series of vivid paintings adorning a remaining portion of the Berlin Wall. The Brandenburg Gate has stood through some tumultuous times and is well worth seeing. The city has a diverse variety of museums to explore. Experience the Cold War days in the DDR and Stasi Museums, inspect ancient wonders in the Neues and Pergamon, and follow the varied history of Berlin’s Jews in the Judisches Museum. For sweeping views of the city, ascend the dramatic Glass Dome of the Reichstag. Chill out in the peaceful Tiergarten and sample distinctive German cuisine at Kollwitzplatz Food Market. Although Berlin isn’t near the seaside, you can still get your beach fix at one of the urban beaches along the River Spree, featuring imported sand and all the accoutrements including sunloungers and bars.

Top Free Attractions Map in Berlin - What to Do in Berlin

Pergamon Museum (Paid)

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This museum, opened in 1930 after a twenty-year building period, was designed to house the archeological treasures which were being unearthed by German exploration of ancient sites. The collection includes monumental structures including the Pergamon Altar built for Zeus and the Market Gate of Miletus, which were transported in parts from Turkey. Also essential is the vast blue Ishtar Gate from Babylon, and the facade of King Nebuchadnezzar’s magnificent throne hall. The collection is divided into sections on Antiquities, the Middle East and Islamic Art. There are many different types of exhibits, including ceramics, metalwork and wood carvings. However, the larger exhibits are what draw the most crowds, and this is one of Berlin’s most popular museums. It’s worth going to marvel at the wonderful architectural achievements of the ancient world. You can also see how ordinary people lived, such as in the 17th century Aleppo Zimmer, a colourful room from a merchant’s house in Syria that is decorated with Arabian and Persian poetry
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Walking Tour of Berlin (Free)

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This is an ideal way to get to know Berlin, giving an overview of various sites which you may then choose to explore in further detail. There are several companies offering tours, but one that is completely free is offered by Sandeman’s New Europe. Meeting every day at the famous Brandenburg Gate (link), the three and a half hour walk takes in the Reichstag (link), the Holocaust Memorial, the recreated Checkpoint Charlie guarding the Wall, the Old Royal Boulevard (Unter den Linden) and many more. The tour finishes up at Museum Island where you can admire views of the twin cathedrals, followed by the Lustgarten - the old royal gardens. While wandering around the city you will also travel back in time into the city’s varied history, including its darkest times as well as happier moments. The walk is taken at a leisurely pace and includes a coffee break, so don’t worry if three and a half hours sounds a bit daunting.
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Alternative Tour of Berlin (Free)

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A great way to get a flavour of the real Berlin and what makes it unique is to take an alternative tour. One such tour is operated by Alternative Berlin Tours, meeting three times daily. During the three hour duration, you will view the world famous street art and graffiti, see artist squats and multicultural neighbourhoods, a huge skatepark and alternative entertainment venue, urban farms, daytime raves, eclectic shops and flea markets in the summer. You can meet local artists and interesting characters. All the guides are actively involved in the street art and entertainment scene, and are full of stories and knowledge of the places you will see. They can give recommendations on nightlife and other things. Tours are free - you tip what you feel your guide deserves. Although no booking is necessary, smaller groups are preferred so it’s best to phone ahead if you’re in a group of ten or more.
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Tiergarten (Free)

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This expansive urban park in the centre of Berlin offers a tranquil respite from the hustle and bustle of the city. There is a wide variety of vegetation, from forested areas to open parkland popular for picnics, and monuments including statues and the restored Beethoven-Mozart-Haydn memorial. Allow a full day if you want to explore the whole of the park, as it covers a vast area of 520 acres. Cycling is a great way to get around. Other features include Venus Lake where you can rent a paddleboat, a restaurant and bar with beer garden, and several playgrounds. Berlin Zoo is located at the south-eastern corner, housing over 15,000 animals. There is also the Victory Column, a 226-foot pillar of red granite topped by a golden statue of a goddess. It’s possible to ascend the column - quite a trek but one that is rewarded by stunning views of the park and city.
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Brandenburg Gate (Free)

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An iconic structure and one of the must-see sights of Berlin, this monumental gate, located at Pariser Platz, marks the start of the long tree-lined boulevard of Unter den Linden (link). The neoclassical gate was built in the late 18th century, replacing an earlier city gate. It has had quite a turbulent history; it was significantly damaged during the Second World War, cut off from the rest of the city when the Berlin Wall was built, and was fully restored at the turn of the millennium. Since the fall of the Wall in 1989, it has become a symbol of unity and peace. The Gate is topped by a sculpture, known as a quadriga, of the goddess of victory riding into the city to bring peace. There are many other carvings on the Gate’s passages representing classical myths, such as the labours of Hercules, which symbolise the struggles of the Prussian Wars at the time the Gate was built.
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Holocaust Memorial (Free)

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This striking memorial, located near the Brandenburg Gate (link), is in two parts. First, there is an above ground field of concrete blocks or stelae, of varying heights. Walking along the pathways between them is designed to produce a dark, confusing and foreboding atmosphere, evocative of the senseless tragedy of the Holocaust. Then there is an underground information centre where you can find out more about the personal lives of the victims, including the opportunity to do computer research on family histories. The memorial was opened in 2005, sixty years after the end of the Second World War, and has since proven very popular with locals as well as overseas visitors. It provides a space for reflection on one of the darkest episodes in history, and the underground area brings home just how many ordinary lives were shattered by this. Definitely worth a visit on any trip to Berlin
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Neues Museum (Paid)

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One of several museums located on Museum Island, the Neues Museum (New Museum) focuses on ancient Egyptian and prehistorical artefacts, most notably the famous bust of Queen Nefertiti dating from 1360 BC. First opened in 1855 as a counterpoint to the Royal Museum (which was then renamed the Old Museum), it was heavily damaged in the Second World War and was finally reopened in 2009, following an extensive rebuilding by British architect David Chipperfield. Parts of the original damaged structure are still visible, forming a fascinating blend between old and new design. It aims to provide an insight into the early development of mankind, including a Neanderthal skull and the well-known Egyptian Papyrus Collection. These are presented in an organic fashion with different collections overlapping each other to give an idea of progress in different areas. It’s not just ancient objects though - you can also view a twenty-foot length of barbed wire from the Berlin Wall.
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East Side Gallery (Free)

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This is one of only a few remaining sections of the Berlin Wall, and features 105 paintings along its 1.3km length in the Mühlenstraße. It is thought to be the largest open air gallery in the world. Painted in 1990, the works symbolise a move towards a brighter future in a united Germany. As a whole the Gallery is a fantastic profusion of colours and styles. Some of the most famous paintings include a kiss between the leaders of West and East Berlin by Dimitrji Vrubel and Birgit Kinder’s Trabi (Trabant) demolishing the Wall. It’s worth going to see what remains of the Gallery while you can, as a section was recently destroyed to make way for luxury apartments. However, in 2009, work started to renovate some of the paintings. The Gallery stands as a symbol of freedom and liberation from oppression and definitely shouldn’t be missed on any trip to Berlin
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Glass Dome of the Reichstag Berlin (Free)

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One of the most distinctive tourist attractions in Berlin, this dome sits atop the German parliament building, and was installed following the fall of the Berlin Wall. It’s free to climb up to the dome, take in the fantastic views all around, and view the proceedings in the debating chamber down below. This symbolises the new transparency of the government, as opposed to the Cold War period, and puts the citizens above the government. British architect Norman Foster won a competition to design the dome in 1993. It is intricately constructed, with a mirrored cone which directs sunlight into the building and lets visitors see what’s going on. Access is via two opposite spiralling steel ramps. Although admission is free, it’s highly advisable to book in advance, which you can do on the website. Audioguides are available in ten languages, giving information on the Parliament Building, the workings of the government and the surrounding sights
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Berlin History Museum (Paid)

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This museum on Unter den Linden (link) is an ideal way to get a quick overview of the history of the city and would make a great starting point for your holiday. It definitely packs a lot into a small space. Starting at the city’s beginnings in the 12th and 13th centuries, the displays take you right through Berlin’s development, with a lot of information on the rebuilding, division and eventual reunification after the Second World War. After touring the Museum, there are two films to watch. First, a documentary on the Berlin Wall with images of its construction and demise, lasting fifteen minutes; and the second taking in the entire eight hundred years of the city’s history in twenty-five minutes. There is a bookshop in the Museum; recommendations on what to buy are distributed throughout the Museum, so you can learn more on a specific topic. Audioguides are also available in multiple languages.
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Judisches Museum (Paid)

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Translated as the Jewish Museum, this striking zig-zag-shaped building was built as an extension of the Berlin Museum, from which it is accessible via an underground tunnel. It opened in 2001. The permanent exhibition focuses on two millennia of German Jewish History, as seen from the perspective of the Jews. There are displays on medieval settlements on the Rhine, notable Jewish figures, a more upbeat time in the 19th century Age of Emancipation, followed by the catastrophe of the Holocaust and the subsequent emigration of survivors, concluding with the influx of 200,000 Jews from the former Soviet Union. A second underground tunnel leads to the Garden of Exile, a restful outdoor space, and the final tunnel leads to the Holocaust Tower, a bleak empty space lit only by a small skylight in the ceiling. Not only focusing on the persecution of the Jews, the museum aims to capture daily life in all its facets - food, customs and even Jewish humour
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DDR Museum (Paid)

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This exciting interactive museum shows what life was like in East Germany in the Cold War days of the DDR (Deutsche Demokratische Republik). Founded in 2006, it quickly became one of the most popular museums in Berlin and was nominated for the European Museum of the Year Award two years later. You are encouraged to handle the exhibits to see what life was like in those days, and there are recreations of people’s homes. You can even go for a drive through a concrete housing estate in a Trabi, the seminal car of the era. Bugs give you the sense that you are under the watchful eye of the State. Food shortages were a problem in the DDR with many products not arriving in stores or being exported. You can learn more about the travails that people went through in the diary of Ingeborg Lüdicke, one of the State’s residents. Also on display is a simulation of the workings of the reigning Socialist Union Party
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Bauhaus Archive (Paid)

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Essential if you’re interested in the history of architecture and design, this museum highlights the innovations of the Bauhaus movement which took place in the interwar years. It includes works by such luminaries as Paul Klee and Wassily Kandinsky. The building has a striking design, as envisaged by co-founder Walter Gropius in 1964, consisting of a series of sheds with curved roofs. Due to some political restrictions by the State, the museum was not opened until 1979. Inside, examples of Bauhaus work include pottery, metalwork, furniture and textiles. Many designs had a profound impact beyond the immediate movement, influencing everyday items to the present day. There are also frequent workshops, lectures, exhibitions and concerts, as well as temporary exhibitions. An audioguide is included with admission and comes in seven languages. Reproductions of original pieces are available in the gift shop, and the library houses over 26,000 books, journals and catalogues.
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Stasi Museum (Paid)

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Very interesting to visit in conjunction with the DDR Museum (link), which gives an insight into the daily life of residents of East Germany behind the Berlin Wall, whereas the Stasi Museum shows the workings of the secret police who kept tabs on them. Offices and the conference room have been perfectly preserved from how they were when citizens overtook the complex in 1990. It’s fascinating to get a flavour of a time when all aspects of life were controlled by the state; there was certain music you weren’t allowed to listen to (you can see examples in the collection of subversive materials), children were taught in school to have absolute allegiance to the Socialist regime, and punishments for transgressions from the norm were often disproportionately harsh. There is an array of surveillance equipment to look at, including secret cameras and the various places they were hidden, such as behind a button on clothing.
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KollwitzPlatz Food Market (Free)

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This friendly farmer’s market takes place in one of Berlin’s most attractive squares every Thursday and Saturday and makes a great day out for the family. A wide range of produce is on offer including organic meats, fish, pasta, chocolates, sweets, as well as clothes stalls and arts and crafts. Things aren’t too expensive and are probably on a par with local supermarkets. If you get hungry wandering around, there are many stalls selling delicious snacks such as kebabs, waffles and bratwurst, as well as fresh coffee and juice. Kollwitzplatz itself is an upmarket area, refurbished following the fall of the Berlin Wall. There are numerous cafes and restaurants and even kids’ playgrounds in the square. The market fills up with visitors quickly in the summer, so a good tip is to either come early (from 9am) or visit the less congested Thursday market, which features locally produced olive oils, jams and honey.
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Unter den Linden (Free)

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Unter den Linden is a famous street running from the Lustgarten Park in the east to Brandenburg Gate (link) in the west. It is named after its iconic linden (lime trees) that populate the central grassed pedestrian section. These were first planted over 350 years ago. You can see many historic sites and a lot of grand Prussian architecture as you stroll down the boulevard. Among these are the Berlin opera house and library, and the imposing Neue Wache, built after the defeat of Napoleon to house the royal guards. Nowadays it is the National Memorial for the Victims of War and Tyranny. The oldest building on the street is the German Historical Museum, built as the Zeughaus Arsenal between 1695 and 1706. There is also the large Humboldt University. Although the boulevard was devastated in World War II, it was sympathetically reconstructed in a neoclassical style. There are also several statues, most notably Friedrich II on horseback.
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Auguststrasse (Free)

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This street has gained a reputation as one of Berlin’s top spots for nightlife as well as a cultural centre with many art galleries. Clärchen’s Ballroom is one of the iconic institutions of the street. Founded in 1913, it offers a taste of a different era where you can strut your stuff in the salsa, tango and swing evenings. Across the street is the Mitte Beach Bar, which offers as laidback an experience as you can get without a beach. The Jewish School for Girls is a hub of art and culture, reopened in 2012 after a long period of standing empty. It includes the Fuchs Gallery, the Photo Gallery Camera Work, and restaurants where you can enjoy your food surrounded by the stylish twenties architecture. There are also many tiny galleries, usually free of charge, that you can wander into and out of at will. Most consist of just one or two rooms, with frequently changing exhibitions
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Humboldt Box (Paid)

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This eyecatching building, consisting of a five-storey metal box in silver and blue, opened in June 2011 and was designed as a viewing platform for the construction of the new Berlin Palace, also known as the Humboldt Forum. It has a rootop terrace and restaurant and also hosts temporary exhibitions. The total floor space is 3000 square metres. After the opening of the new Palace in 2019, the Box is expected to be dismantled. Attractions inside the Box include a large model of the old city of Berlin, as well as one of the new Palace, and you can follow its construction. Spectacular views can be enjoyed from the top, including the Schlossplatz where the building is located, and Museum Island. There are also interactive art exhibits which look at topics relating to ethnic cultures around the world, as a sample of what will be on offer in the new Humboldt Forum
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B-Flat Jazz Club (Paid)

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For a fun night out in Berlin, why not try this famous Jazz Club on Rosenthaler Strasse. Opened in 1995 by musician brothers Jannis and Thannasis Zotos and the actor André Hennecke, it has become a key part of Berlin’s nightlife, with concerts every night except Sunday. On Wednesday nights there is a weekly jam session hosted by bassist Robin Draganic, who welcomes various guests. This is very popular, so it’s worth booking a table. Both local and international artists play at the B-Flat, and over the years these have included Harry Connick Jr, Kurt Rosenwinkel and Judy Niemack. Drinks are on offer at reasonable prices, including a fantastic range of cocktails. No air conditioning, but this adds to the sweaty atmosphere appropriate to the music being played. There are small orange and red light fittings in an industrial style, which again help to create a great mood together with the yellow walls
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